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35 Bits of Advice for First Year Teachers

First Year Teachers

 

School will be starting again before we know it. I know, I know. No one wants to think about it. Sadly, school supplies are appearing on store shelves and thoughts are already turning to back-to-school.

I remember the summer before I first started teaching. I had just graduated college and I was so incredibly excited. I think I thought I was going to save the world the moment I entered the classroom.

I just knew that every lesson I prepared was going to be amazing and that my students were going to do so well that they would destroy achievement data.

And then I couldn’t find a job.

School started and students and teachers went back—and I didn’t.

I started the school year substitute teaching. And I hated every second of it. I didn’t find any joy at all in being in a classroom that wasn’t mine. It was a serious emotional challenge.

A few weeks into the school year I was called into a great high school to substitute for a teacher who had passed away (tragic story. He had a heart attack one afternoon and quickly passed. He was far too young for such a thing). After several weeks of subbing, I was asked to stay in the position permanently.

While the circumstances were tragic, I was overjoyed at the opportunity to be able to be a “real” teacher.

I learned a lot that first year. More than I think I’ve learned any year since.

So if you’re about to enter the classroom for the very first time as a “real” teacher, here’s a bit of advice.

  1. You are not going to save the world your first year. But you can certainly try.
  2. Many of your lessons and activities are going to fail. Be okay with that. Be a good example to your students and pick up the pieces and try again.
  3. You’ll be a completely different teacher in a few years. Don’t get used to who you are now.
  4. Be willing to adapt. Flexibility and adaptation are the name of the game your first year.
  5. I once had a teacher I very much respected tell me that because I taught high school I shouldn’t smile until after Christmas. I smiled on day one and all the days after.
  6. Decide if you want to be respected or liked. The two are not always mutually exclusive, but you’re not there to be your students’ friend.
  7. Don’t let your students call you by your first name. Ever. I don’t care if you are 22 and they are 18. Or 5.
  8. Keep your mouth shut. (This bit of advice from my hubby who has been teaching for 15 years). New teachers should be quick to listen and slow to share their “brilliant” ideas. Share when appropriate, but don’t try to re-write the book on teaching.
  9. (Along with #8…) You’re not a mentor yet. Don’t try to tell seasoned teachers how to do their jobs.
  10. Never talk about having a “teacher toolbox” when referring to teaching strategies (also from my hubby).
  11. Don’t wear anything with an apple or a pencil or a bus on it. Ever.save the world
  12. Dress appropriately. Dress up really classy on Mondays. It sets the tone for the week.
  13. Don’t let your students get away with cheating. Ever. (Refer to #6).
  14. Remember that you’re not just teaching subject matter—your personality is a reflection of your character.
  15. Don’t over-volunteer. Sometimes being an eager beaver can get you hours of extra work outside of the school day, and you’ll need that time for planning and grading, etc.
  16. Don’t gossip. You have no idea who is friends with whom on your faculty or what history they have. Be classy and keep your mouth shut and your opinions about people to yourself.
  17. Respect the administration. You don’t have to like their policies or policy changes, but respect the process and the people behind the process. Those folks work hard.
  18. Get a mentor. Sometimes you will be assigned one, but if that mentor is not helpful or you aren’t given one, attach yourself to a seasoned teacher and ask for advice. Lots of advice.
  19. Be humble. If something is working in your classroom, share appropriately and be ready for seasoned teachers to help you adapt it to make it better. (Refer to #8).
  20. Have school spirit. No matter what age-group you teach, be proud of your school. If you aren’t, the kids won’t be, either.
  21. Don’t eat lunch at your desk. Get into the cafeteria, make friends with other teachers at the “teacher table” and watch the dynamic of your students as they interact with each other. You can learn a ton about student personalities and relationships over lunch.
  22. Don’t be afraid to report something that needs to be reported. Whether student abuse or teacher impropriety, don’t sit on it if it’s serious.
  23. Don’t blog about being an awesome teacher. You aren’t yet.teaching
  24. Find the happy medium between being excited about and dreading professional development. Some teachers get a little too happy about it (I’m going to save the world with these strategies for my teacher toolbox!) while others act like sitting through professional development might be reason to have the coroner on hand. PD can be cool. You might not use everything presented to you, but you can learn something—if you try.
  25. Love your students. Even the ones that are difficult to love. They deserve it and they might not be getting it at home.
  26. Be fair. Never play favorites with students.
  27. Don’t show too many movies. If movies are your go-to, you aren’t creative enough.
  28. Never leave your students alone in the classroom. Chaos will ensue.
  29. Never use profanity in front of your students. Set high standards for yourself and your students will follow.
  30. Good classroom management comes from being wise enough to know when to be firm and when to laugh. (Refer to #6.) This takes practice.
  31. Never be afraid to apologize to a student.
  32. A student who has wronged you but is forgiven will never forget it.
  33. Students like “fun” teachers. They respect and remember the ones who push them to their greatest potential.
  34. Use caution when eating homemade goodies gifted to you from a student.
  35. Be grateful—for your job, for your mentor, and for any seasoned teacher and administrator who is willing to help you. Someday you can repay it to a first year teacher.

Be excited about your first year as a teacher. Give it your all. Smile a lot. But most of all, be willing to learn. Your goal in your career should always be to be a better teacher than you were last year. 30 years of that will produce some amazing results.

Share with me: Seasoned teachers, what advice would you add to this list?

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Why Those Who “Can’t”, Teach

books and glasses___

I’m not the best athlete in the world. I’m not the greatest singer or the most amazing artist. I’m not a well-renowned historian, nor have I written the next great American novel. I have not discovered the cure for cancer and I probably won’t ever dance with the Moscow Ballet.

But love what I do.

I’m good at it.

I love how it makes me feel when I work hard, accomplish my goals, and master my craft.

I may never be famous for it, but I have to do it. It’s part of me.

And that part of me must be shared.

I teach because I can’t do anything else.

I can’t do anything else. Nothing else fuels the passion in me for the craft that I love– nothing fuels it like sharing it.

And so I teach.

I don’t do it for the money or the time off, or the late nights spent working on lessons or creating new ways to help you learn.

I do it because maybe, just maybe, you’ll find that what I love, you love, too.

I teach because I want you to love.

I teach for the moments when your eyes light up because a fire has been sparked within you. It’s the same fire that burns in me.

I teach for the smiles, the laughter, the joy– my reactions to your learning, shared with you at your own accomplishments.

I teach because my heart aches for you to engage– for you to develop a sense of self through the discovery of doing what God created you to do.

I teach because it’s fun.

I teach despite the naysayers– those who give voice to the idea that teaching, in any capacity, is easy.

I teach despite the laws, regulations, and codes that tie my hands, rendering me to often feel ineffective.

I teach despite the long days, constant training, and never-ending paperwork.

I teach because I love.

I love my craft; my area of expertise. But more than that, I love you.

I love it when you are a blank page, ready to be inscribed with the knowledge you will need to conquer the world.

I love it when you are a closed book–difficult and moody– you challenge me, and I never back down from a challenge.

I love it when you respond to what I’m teaching– when I see you growing and changing before my eyes.

I love it most of all when you realize that I do what I do because I love you.

I want you to grow.

I want you to find what it is you are passionate about.

I want you to work harder, be better, achieve more, and do things– things I’ll never do.

I want you to be better than I could ever be.

I teach because what I love requires that to be brilliant at it, I love those who want to learn.

And so I push myself. I push myself to be better and faster and stronger and smarter– for you.

I push myself to do more and be more and achieve more so that you will be greater.

I continue to learn and develop new techniques and master my craft for the sole purpose of sharing it with you.

But I remind myself that you are not me.

You might not love what I love. You might not respond to me the way I hope.

You might not understand that when I look at you, I see a person perfectly created by a great and mighty God.

But I will continue to teach you, praying that this God-given passion that drives me gives me the opportunity to show you a glimpse of what I love, and if nothing else, let you know that you can be passionate about something–anything–too.

Above all, that’s what I want you to find–something you are passionate about.

So passionate that you must share it with someone else.

So I teach because, by the grace of God, I can.

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Teacher Gifts- The 12 Days of Christmas

presents

It’s the Christmas season, which means not only are you shopping for friends and family, but also for all the teachers in the lives of your children.

School teachers, Sunday school teachers, extra-curricular activities teachers, even coaches! Yep, they are probably all on your list.

Seeing as how I am married to a teacher and I was a teacher myself, I’m pretty sure that I am an expert in the area of “Teacher Gifts.” So let me help you out this year.

I wanted to do something special for my son’s teacher, but we live on a budget, so what did I do? I turned to Pinterest, of course. From there I was inspired, added my own touches, and came up with the Twelve Days of Christmas for Teachers.

The original inspiration came from this site, but I changed some of the gift choices and created my own gift tags.

My gift choices–

DSCN6589

Twelve Days of Christmas for Teachers

  • Day 1- hand lotion
  • Day 2- gourmet chocolates
  • Day 3- popcorn
  • Day 4- dry erase markers
  • Day 5- cocoa
  • Day 6- glue sticks
  • Day 7- stickers
  • Day 8- pens
  • Day 9- Hershey Kisses
  • Day 10- monogram note cards
  • Day 11- gloves & chocolate
  • Day 12- candle and socks

Each gift will be wrapped and sent with a little note that includes a poem about that day’s item.

Here’s an example of one of the gift tag poems:

To stay in my seat is what you want me to do,

Sometimes you just might have to use glue!

None of the gifts included in this project cost me more than $5 each.

While some of the gifts match the number of the day that they are on (5 packages of cocoa for day 5, etc), not all of them do. That’s okay. As long as the poem you send on that day makes sense, it’s all good.

I went to the dollar store to purchase cute little gift bags (25 for $1). Add tissue paper and some ribbon, and each day holds a special surprise.

Your child can deliver a gift every day for 12 days, or you can package all of the items together into one large gift. I plan to let my son deliver a daily gift.

To use the gift tag poems I created, click below.

12 Days Gift Tags– click to print

This is an example of the gift tags with poems that I made. Click below to print.

This is an example of the gift tag with poem.

** Keep in mind that my son goes to a Christian school, so some of these poems do mention the Bible and God.

If you aren’t feeling up to doing the 12 Days, here are some tips when buying presents for teachers:

  • School supplies and items that can be used in the classroom are helpful because many teachers have to spend money from their own pockets to keep supplies in their classrooms. Computer paper is always great because it’s often not supplied by the school, and teachers print a lot of stuff.
  • If you have an “about me” page from your child’s teacher that includes things like favorite food, favorite candle scent, favorite restaurant, etc., don’t ignore that. Those papers are supposed to make your shopping life easier. For example, I know that my son’s teacher really likes Hershey’s chocolate, so I made sure to include that in the 12 Days.
  • If you have a little more money to spend, gift cards to movies and restaurants are ALWAYS appreciated.
  • If you really want to go all out, think a gift certificate for a spa day or a gift card to the mall or a clothing store.
  • If you don’t have a ton of money to spend, think about doing a $5 gift card to a place like Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts. A little treat can be a big deal. (These kinds of gifts work great for male teachers, too!)
  • Personalized stationary makes a great gift. Notepads or cards are great for sending notes home to parents or just jotting things down at school.
  • A nice pen is also a great gift. Teachers write. A lot.
  • Try to be intentional. Don’t go for the easy “apple”. Look for something that would make that teacher smile, like a desktop joke calendar.
  • Have your child write a note to the teacher expressing some kind personal thoughts about him/her. Many teachers save notes like this, especially as your child ages and the notes become fewer and farther between. I taught high school, and I still have a box of personal notes from students. They make my heart happy.

What NOT to give a teacher:

  • ANY KIND of jewelry or clothing, etc., that has an apple, a bus, a pencil, or any other teaching paraphernalia on it. Don’t do it. It’s not as cute as you think it is.
  • Ornaments. An ornament can be a nice gift, but teachers get a lot of ornaments. If you go for one that’s personalized or represents something special about that teacher, then it might be okay. But referring above, do NOT go with a school bus, a pencil, or an apple. Or an ornament with your kid’s face on it. See below.
  • A framed photograph of your child. No offense, but teachers are just like you– they don’t want random photos in their homes, and they certainly can’t display framed photos of your kid at school. Favoritism much?
  • Homemade goodies. Again, teachers tend to get a lot of these. More than they can eat. Most of it ends up in the trash.

Another teacher gift idea:

I wanted to do something cute for some of the other teachers in my boys lives, and once again, Pinterest inspired.

I decided to make these adorable Soap Reindeer.

DSCN6585

Made out of washcloths, there’s a gourmet bar of soap inside each one. Cute, affordable, and still a treat.

I purchased the bars of soap at World Market ($3.99 each), where I happened to find peppermint vanilla fragrance. Perfect.

I also had to purchase the washcloths, googlie eyes, pipe cleaners, and red Rudolph noses. The entire gift was under $6.50 per person.

The original idea and tutorial for making them can be found here. Also included on that site are cute poems for the gift tag for this present.

I hope these ideas will help you this season!

Share with me: What cute or creative gift ideas have you found (for anyone) this season?

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